Last edited by Goltile
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Health care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe found in the catalog.

Health care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

Michael Charles Kaser

Health care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

by Michael Charles Kaser

  • 386 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Croom Helm in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • National health services -- Europe, Eastern,
  • National health services -- Soviet Union

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index

    StatementMichael Kaser
    The Physical Object
    Pagination278 p. ;
    Number of Pages278
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14563209M

    Abstract The analysis presented in this report assembles, for the first time, evidence from a variety of sources in the countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union to show that policy and institutional reforms are important in achieving higher productivity growth. Soviet physicians earn only 70 percent of the salary of the average nonfarm worker in the Soviet Union. Striking disparities in health status and outcomes exist as well among the fifteen Soviet Cited by:

    Disability is an important issue for the transition countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Not only is a significant portion of their population either in poor health or disabled - with implications for labor force participation and productivity - but their aging demographics project an increase in the share of disabled people, raising concerns about the sustainability of. Book Reviews Women’s experiences of repression in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe by Kelly Hignett, Melanie Ilic, Dalia Leinarte and Corina Snitar, Abingdon, Routledge, , pp., £ (hbk), ISBN ; (ebook)Author: Aigi Rahi-Tamm.

    To the Editors: This note is a response to Nick Eberstadt, “The Health Crisis in the USSR” which appeared in The New York Review of Books, Febru All quotes unless otherwise noted are from Eberstadt’s article. Contrary to Eberstadt’s sensationalist claims, neither Soviet medical care nor Soviet socialism is falling apart. Book: Social Policy, Poverty, and Inequality in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Sofiya An, Tatiana Chubarova, Bob Deacon, Paul Stubbs (eds).. This edited volume maps the developments and trajectories of welfare states in several post-socialist countries and discusses the outcomes of prioritizing economic growth over social welfare.


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Health care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe by Michael Charles Kaser Download PDF EPUB FB2

Health Care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe [Michael Charles. Kaser] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Health care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. [Michael Charles Kaser] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Michael Charles Kaser.

Find more information about: ISBN: # National health services--Soviet Union\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Health Care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe; Book Review Health Care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe Br Med J ; 2 doi: https: Health Care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe Br Med J ; BibTeX (win & mac)Download; EndNote (tagged)Download;Author: Andrew Semple.

Health Care in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Full text. Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by : Andrew Semple.

This is an interesting detailed comparison of health care in the Soviet Union and the six other Eastern European states (Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Rumania) of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (Comecon).

This Soviet-dominated economic integration was promoted as a counter-measure to the establishment of the Common by: 5. Medicine and Public Health in the USSR and the Eastern Bloc The USSR was the first country to put the health protection of its citizens officially at the centre of its concerns, insisting that in this domain, as in others, it would differ from Tsarist Russia and the capitalist West.

This book is output from an international workshop held in June in St. Petersburg and takes stock of the diverse and divergent welfare trajectories of post-socialist countries across central, eastern, and southeastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Policies, specializing in health systems monitoring for Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union.

Martin McKee is Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom, and Director of Research Policy at the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. Health reform in central and eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Bernd Rechel, Martin McKee. In the two decades since the fall of the Berlin Wall, former communist countries in Europe have pursued wide-ranging changes to their health systems. Europe PMC is a service of the Europe PMC Funders' Group, in partnership with the European Bioinformatics Institute, JISC, The University of Manchester and the British Library; and in cooperation with the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

Informal payments (IPs) for publicly funded health care services, in the form of cash and gifts-in-kind, represent a persistent chal- lenge to health reform in the Former Soviet Union (FSU) and in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries, including Hungary (Baji et al.

Moldova, which is much poorer, has given a higher priority to government health care expenditure, achieving lower out-of-pocket payments and has better access to care (Table 1 and Figure 1).

In the early stages of transition, during the initial health care reforms, personal knowledge and advice from others, Cited by: These payments are pervasive in central and eastern Europe, with the possible exception of the Czech Republic,10, 65 and are a major impediment to health-care reform, 16, 63, 64, 65 Although evidence for their extent and magnitude is incomplete—an indication of their illegal status—they are especially common in some of the poorest post Cited by: How did healthcare system change in Eastern Europe countries following the collapse of the Soviet Union Countries transition from free healthcare system provided by the national governments to pay-for-services healthcare system offered by private healthcare providers.

This volume presents work from an international group of writers who explore conceptualizations of what defined “East” and “West” in Eastern Europe, imperial Russia, and the Soviet Union. The contributors analyze the effects of transnational interactions on Format: Paperback.

This chapter discusses public health in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Topics covered include patterns of health, patterns of mortality, higher death rates in men than in women, effective health-care interventions, and public health training : Martin Mckee.

How did the fall of the Soviet Union impact the health care system in Eastern Europe. Countries retained their free government health care systems. The largest minority group in Europe is the. muslims. Many people in Eastern Europe burn wood to heat their homes because.

The Soviet Union has three times as many hospital beds and twice as many physicians per capita as the United States but spends only one-eighth the amount the United States spends on health services.

Inhealth care spending accounted for percent of the Soviet gross national product (GNP), Cited by:   Chubarova contributed to a number of books such as Health Reforms in Central and Eastern Europe: Options, Obstacles, Limited Outcomes (ed.

by J. Nemec and J. Bjorkman. Eleven Publ., Hague ); Implementation of New Public Management Tools: Experience from Transition and Emerging Countries (ed. by J. Nemec, M.

de Vries. Population policy and reform: The Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and China In many ways, the impression of a common pattern given by the nearly-universal upheavals in what used to be known as the socialist or the Communist bloc, is quite misleading.An introduction to health economics: for Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, Wiley Book January with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.Reports in the popular news media have suggested that both the quality of health care available and, in general, the quality of life in many transition countries has fallen precipitously.

1 This paper provides a wide-ranging, but selective, review of the literature examining health outcomes in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union during Cited by: